Tags: community

Oz Mondejar, Dr. Cheri Blauwet, Kristen McCosh

Partners HealthCare's Oz Mondejar and Dr. Cheri Blauwet with Kristen McCosh, Commissioner for Persons with Disabilities for the City of Boston

Last week marked 25 years since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law. From workplaces to public places, the ADA changed the way Americans with disabilities navigate their daily lives by setting guidelines for things like closed captions on TV, audible walk signs for pedestrians, accessible rest rooms and more.

Staff from Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, Partners HealthCare, and faculty and students from MGH Institute for Health Professions joined hundreds of area citizens on Boston Common last week to celebrate the progress that’s been made in the last couple decades and rally together with other disability advocates and their allies to think about much-needed future efforts.

After a march through the Common, Attorney General Maura Healey and U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz gave remarks on the occasion. One of Spaulding and Brigham and Women’s own also spoke – Dr. Cheri Blauwet, a sports medicine physician, instructor at Harvard Medical School and accomplished wheelchair racer with Paralympic medals and multiple marathon championships to her name.

At Partners HealthCare, we do more than care for persons with disabilities; we also open doors to career opportunities for candidates of all abilities. Innovative initiatives such as our Working Partners program connect qualified candidates with disabilities with employers who understand the support they need to excel in the workforce. Partners leaders like Oz Mondejar, who has been recognized by the White House as a “Disability Employment Champion of Change,” advocate for these efforts to make sure the progress we make can help inform national conversations on supporting employees of all abilities.

We’re glad to mark 25 years of progress and eager to help bring about continued change to support Americans with disabilities.